Natural Resources & Land Management

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Natural Resources & Land Management

The Upper Peninsula has more than10.5 million acres of forests that support a vast number of businesses and industries, from lumber products to wood specialty products. Mining is a vital part of the Upper Peninsula heritage, from the Marquette Iron Range to Keweenaw County’s “Copper Country” — once the only place on earth that held commercial quantities of pure native copper.

PURE AND PRODUCTIVE

Today the region boasts three active nickel mines, one of which is the nation’s only primary nickel mine. Because the Upper Peninsula treasures its natural resources, it is also a world leader in responsible mining and land management practices. The Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP), an independent, science-based program that measures environmental performance of mining operations, reports that the Upper Peninsula’s largest mine, Eagle Mine, exceeds industry standards and has been recognized by mines around the world.

Local research universities work with public and private landowners and industries to benefit forest and water health and commercial and recreational use. In addition, our companies work together to ensure the region’s forests are sustainable by conserving wildlife habitats, soil and water quality, and by preventing and minimizing pollution.

Due to these efforts, the Upper Peninsula remains a vast and pristine wilderness, carefully managed to ensure decades of productivity.

The Upper Peninsula has historic mining roots dating back to the earliest days of mineral exploration. Mining was the foundation on which so many of our towns and cities were built. The world’s great explorers called the U.P. home not that long ago. Our wild landscape is rich with minerals, and several mining companies are still operating. Eagle Mine, for example, employs 200 U.P. residents and sustainably mines high-grade nickel and copper. Mining is the richness of our history, but is also the richness of our minds.